Costa’s Hummingbird

In late-Spring, I had a Costa’s Hummingbird visit my backyard hummingbird feeders.  I only saw the Costa’s one afternoon.

Costa’s migrate to Southern Nevada in the Summer to breed.  I have watched for a return visit from the Costa’s or other Costa’s hummingbirds but so far I haven’t seen another one.

Per TheCornellLab of Ornithology’s website All About Birds:  A desert hummingbird, Costa’s Hummingbird breeds in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts of California and Arizona.  It departs the desert in the hottest days of summer, moving to Chaparral, scrub or woodland habitat.

I assume if I was to visit Mount Charleston, about 45 minutes north-west of Las Vegas, I might have a better chance to see another Costa’s this summer.

This particular Costa’s was as curious about me as I was about him.  After drinking at the feeder he flew to within a few feet of me and hovered in front of me, just observing me watching him, before flying up into the limbs of my neighbor’s mesquite tree.

He spent a few minutes in the tree, wiping his beak off against the limb before flying off to not be seen again.  His iridescent violet crown and gorget (throat patch) made him the most colorful hummingbird visitor so far this year.

Several hummingbirds make Southern Nevada home during various times of the year.  They include:  Anna’s Hummingbird, Black-chinned Hummingbird, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Rufous Hummingbird, Calliope Hummingbird and of course the Costa’s Hummingbird.


To learn more about the Costa’s Hummingbird, visit the websites below:

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