Morning Glory

I sometimes think of Morning Glory as a forgotten flower.  At least here in the southwestern United States, I rarely see it planted.  I’m not sure I have seen it planted in the Las Vegas Valley, more than one time.

The neighbor who lived across the street from me, when I was growing up, used to grow Heavenly Blue Morning Glory on a white-painted, wood fence that divided her front and backyards on the north side of her house.  The morning glory did very well there and the Heavenly Blue lived up to its name.

Heavenly Blue Morning Glory growing on a decorative, wood fence (Cedar City, UT)

Heavenly Blue Morning Glory growing on a decorative, wood fence (Cedar City, UT)

I first became aware of the beautiful morning glory flowers on my neighbor’s fence.  I loved how when you got up close to the flowers they seemed to have the yellow of the sun captured in the throat of the otherwise blue flower.

A Heavenly Blue Morning Glory flower.  (Cedar City, UT)

A Heavenly Blue Morning Glory flower. (Cedar City, UT)

I have attempted to grow morning glory a time or two in the past without any success.  Last year, I bought seeds for the Heavenly Blue and Grandpa Ott Morning Glory.  I wanted to try, once again, at growing Morning Glory.  This time, I actually read the instructions on the back of the seed package, which suggested scoring each seed with a sharp knife and then soaking the seeds overnight in water, before planting them.

I tried following the instructions and much to my surprise, I had very good success when I planted the seeds in the containers in my back yard.  The Morning Glory seeds are very hard and scoring them and then soaking them seems to be the secret to growing them successfully.

Even though the seeds of both plants germinated and grew.  I really didn’t have any flowering luck with the Heavenly Blue plants.  But the Grandpa Ott plants did very well.

The Grandpa Ott Morning Glory is a dark purple flower, with distinctive lighter purple lines that come from the throat of the flower and divide the purple in the petal of the flower.

Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Flower

Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Flower

Sometimes, depending on the light, it has a more reddish or pinkish color to it.

A Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Flower.

A Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Flower.

I planted it next to one of the posts of my patio cover as well as in a half-whiskey barrel container.  It does best up against the patio cover post as it isn’t in full-sun during the hottest part of the day.

Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Growing Up a Patio Cover Post.

Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Growing Up a Patio Cover Post.

Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Planted in a Half-whiskey Barrel Container.

Grandpa Ott Morning Glory Planted in a Half-whiskey Barrel Container.

This year, in addition to planting Grandpa Ott Morning Glory again, I also planted Blue Star and an Old Glory Mix.  I planted the Blue Star and Old Glory Mix next to the patio post, where the Grandpa Ott did so well last year.

I was surprised when the Blue Star started blooming.  Instead of white flowers with a bluish/violet line breaking up the white, my flowers had much more blue than white.  Only one flower, so far, has actually resembled the flowers shown on the seed package.  As far as I can tell, the pictures below are the Blue Star Morning Glory, unless there was a mix up in the packaging of the seeds.  You can see how different the flowers are from what the package showed in the following few pictures.

Blue Star Morning Glory Seed Packet

Blue Star Morning Glory Seed Packet

My Blue Star Morning Glory Flower

My Blue Star Morning Glory Flower

A Blue Star Morning Glory Flower with a Flower from the Old Glory Mix above it.

A Blue Star Morning Glory Flower with a Flower from the Old Glory Mix above it.

One Blue Star Morning Glory Flower (on the left) which Looks Very Close to the Flowers on the Seed Packet.

One Blue Star Morning Glory Flower (on the left) which Looks Very Close to the Flowers on the Seed Packet.

Blue flowers are really quite rare, so I have enjoyed seeing the different amounts of blue in the Blue Star Morning Glory this year.  I’m sure I will try the Heavenly Blue again in the future and hopefully have as much success as my neighbor used to.

The term Morning Glory is used to describe over a thousand different flowers, encompassing many species and genera.

Morning Glory flowers open in early morning and start to fade a few hours before the flowers begin to curl.  Morning Glory can be an invasive plant in many areas.  Morning glories are vigorous climbers and can be used to climb up structures to provide shade for patio’s and buildings.  Morning Glory is usually grown as an annual, but in warmer areas it can come back year after year.  Most Morning Glory will re-seed wherever it is planted.

To see the variety of Morning Glory colors and the various planting uses in yards, do an image search for morning glory.  I am sure you will be impressed with the vivid colors and variety of places they can be grown.


To learn more about Morning Glory, visit the websites below:

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One thought on “Morning Glory

  1. I love the picture of the morning glories growing on the fence. The flowers and vine are lovely. If I had a yard I’d grow them. I love those flowers! YTB

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