Eurasian Collared Doves

This year I have seen several Eurasian Collared Doves among the birds at my backyard feeders.  This is the first year I have noticed them.  But according to birdandhike.com, Eurasian Collared Doves moved into the Las Vegas Valley around 2007-2009.  The site further states “This Eurasian species was imported to the Bahamas in the mid-1970s and became common there in the wild. In the early 1980s, they were reported in Florida. They expanded rapidly, and in 2002 this species had been added to the state lists of Arizona, Oregon, and Washington. In 2013, (there were) recorded several in Alaska.” They apparently are pretty common now in the Las Vegas Valley.

A Collared Dove Sits on the Trunk of a Palm Tree in Las Vegas, Nevada.

A Collared Dove Sits on the Trunk of a Palm Tree in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Collared Doves are considered a medium-sized dove, but are significantly larger than the mourning doves that visit my backyard frequently.  The doves are a gray-buff to pinkish-gray all over and It has a black half-collar edged with white on its nape, which is where it gets its name from. The Collared Doves seem much more skittish than the mourning doves.  They do eventually get used to me sitting in the backyard and will either land on the suet feeders or down on the ground to forage for seeds that have dropped.

A Collared Dove Sits Atop a Suet Feeder in Las Vegas, Nevada.

A Collared Dove Sits Atop a Suet Feeder in Las Vegas, Nevada.

But it takes me sitting pretty still for a much longer time before they will come down from the neighbor’s trees and feed in my yard. While Collared Doves don’t seem to have anywhere near the numbers that mourning doves do, they have pretty much established themselves through much of the continental United States and into Canada and Alaska. They generally raise four broods a year, laying 2 white eggs in a stick nest.  Incubation lasts 14 to 18 days with young fledging after 15 to 19 days.

A Collared Dove Observes Other Birds in My Yard While Perched Atop a Brick Wall.

A Collared Dove Observes Other Birds in My Yard While Perched Atop a Brick Wall.


To learn more about Eurasian Collared Doves visit the websites below:

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